roachpatrol:

jumpingjacktrash:

the-real-seebs:

last-snowfall:

geardrops:

swanjolras:

out of all the aspects of millennial-bashing, i think the one that most confuses me is the “millennials all got trophies as a kid, so now they’re all self-centered narcissists” theory

like— kids are pretty smart, y’all. they can see that every kid on the team gets a trophy and is told they did a good job; they can also see that not every kid on the team deserves a trophy, and not everyone did do a good job

the logical conclusion to draw from this is not “i’m great and i deserve praise”— it’s “no matter how mediocre i am, people will still praise me to make me feel better, so i can’t trust any compliments or accolades i receive”

this is not a recipe for overconfidence and narcissism. it is a recipe for constant self-guessing, low self-esteem, and a distrust of one’s own abilities and skills.

where did this whole “ugh millennials think their so-so work is super great” thing even come from it is a goddamn mystery

what fucking kills me is, yeah, maybe we got the trophies, but who gave them out

this is not a recipe for overconfidence and narcissism. it is a recipe for constant self-guessing, low self-esteem, and a distrust of one’s own abilities and skills.

Which is pretty much what mental health practitioners observe happening.

It’s also what I observed happening as a singing teacher: the older kids literally would not believe a positive word I said until I had proved I would tell them they screwed up/had done badly/etc. I did so in as useful a way as possible (“So this passage. We really need to work on this passage. A lot. This passage is not good yet.”), but with almost every adolescent I taught I had to prove I would give them straight-up criticism before they would parse my praise as anything other than meaningless “the grownups always do this” noise.

Yeah, I’ve run into this a lot. And the thing is, I’m pretty non-empathic about things most of the time. Like, I will quite seriously look at someone I really care about who is in obvious pain and just start laughing because they look funny when they’re in pain. (It is not Jesse’s fault that severe distress makes him look like kermit the frog.) And the beautiful thing is, it turns out I’m really beneficial to people who got screwed by this and ended up with no clue how to tell whether praise is meaningful or sincere, because they don’t have to know me long at all to realize that I’m actually telling them what I think, and if what I think is something they would be proud of, then they can trust that I’m not just saying it to make them feel good.

it’s even worse than that — the culture of universal praise means that a lot of adults would disguise criticism and insults as praise — backhanded compliments, very-obviously-obligatory congratulations, door-prize trophies handed off with a shrug and a sigh. and those ‘compliments’ that twist around and bite you halfway through, like “you have so much potential” and “we always expect so much from you” — oh, and let’s not forget the ‘compliment’ of adults having unrealistically high expectations and disapproving of your inability to meet them. but it’s praise, see, you should be proud that they’re never satisfied with your best efforts because they think you should be a superhero.

which teaches you that not only is praise not positive, praise is poison.

i’m a gen-x’er, btw, not a milennial. i was born in 1972. mine was the first generation raised on participation trophies, gold stars just for being a warm body, and “everyone is special!” before adults learned we’d figured out that if everyone is ‘special’ no one is special.

my parents’ generation was told that if they bust ass and don’t get sick or something, they can have a house, a car, and a living wage. that was the American Dream .

my generation was told that we can be anything! we can be ASTRONAUTS AND PRESIDENTS! ALL OF US! all you have to do is BELIEVE! because you’re SPECIAL! and then when we realized we were growing up to be regular schmoes, we got really weird about it.

i’m honestly not sure what the milennials were told, but whatever it was, i can tell y’all knew it was a ration of shit from the get-go. you’re a generation without a dream. that may be a good thing. we got fed impossible dreams and had to live through losing them. you’ve got to build your own, but from what i’ve seen, you’re doing a hell of a decent job of it.

i guess what i’m trying to say is: here’s one middle-aged guy saying i don’t think you’re a generation of narcissists. i think you’re a generation of individualists. there’s a big difference.

That’s an interesting take on millennials, actually! I consider the defining feature of the millennial generation is that we’re super-social. We band together and support one another ferociously, that I’ve noticed, though I guess also at this point it’s a bit hard to guess how much of it is just teenage cliquishness since so many of us are under-twenty.

But still it seems like 70’s and 80’s teens were a lot more overtly individualistic, removed from society, and contemptuous of society, you know? Stand-offish and uninvolved. Your average millennial now is wired right in to creating, critiquing, repairing, and re-inventing societies. 

Maybe that’s why we’re so standoffish about poisonous praise? ‘You’re not living up to your potential, honey! We wanted so much more…’ the world we’re expected to fit into is gone. The standard by which we’re measured is so obviously and frustratingly warped! We want honesty and transparency, not barbed ass-pats and polite fictions. We need to diagnose problems accurately before we can go and fix them—and we want to fix these problems, we’re desperate to. But all we get is corrupt governments, rigged elections, killer cops, unpaid internships, and Time Magazine running article after article about how self-centered we are to buy an iphone.

I wonder how much more aware kids are now that they’re being lied to, you know? I think maybe it happened gradually over the last fifty years, but I know that millennial kids and boomer adults have intensely different paradigms on basically everything, especially when it comes to privacy, authority, honesty… 

But of course, our parents only wanted the best for us… we were such good kids.  

(Source: swanjolraven)

blurds:

avianrecon:

Good morning! Have a Red Tail, released just after banding. #bird #hawk #wildlife #hawkwatch

hawk sconce

blurds:

avianrecon:

Good morning! Have a Red Tail, released just after banding. #bird #hawk #wildlife #hawkwatch

hawk sconce

becausebirds:

Kiwi on a treadmill.

becausebirds:

Kiwi on a treadmill.

This is Tadashi, my older brother. He wanted to help a lot of people. People keep saying Tadashi’s not really gone, as long as we remember him.

(Source: kristoffbjorgman)

crazyress:

heyfunniest:

Someone took a candid photo of a fight in Ukranian Parliament that is as well-composed as the best renaissance art.

this is legitimately the best thing i’ve ever seen

crazyress:

heyfunniest:

Someone took a candid photo of a fight in Ukranian Parliament that is as well-composed as the best renaissance art.

this is legitimately the best thing i’ve ever seen

mechanicmuffin:

feedmyaddictionnow:

kingofwesteros:

Publicity done right in an anti-rape campaign: double-page spread, pages glued to one another. After the reader forcefully separates them, the image above is revealed with the caption “if you have to use force, it’s rape”.

THIS IS BRILLIANT

I WANT THIS IN EVERY MAGAZINE

mechanicmuffin:

feedmyaddictionnow:

kingofwesteros:

Publicity done right in an anti-rape campaign: double-page spread, pages glued to one another. After the reader forcefully separates them, the image above is revealed with the caption “if you have to use force, it’s rape”.

THIS IS BRILLIANT

I WANT THIS IN EVERY MAGAZINE

(Source: barbarajoangordon)

(Source: emmawathson)

1000-life-hacks:

This diagram could save someone’s life!

1000-life-hacks:

This diagram could save someone’s life!

grey-violet:

thorin-and-twerkteam:

emotional abuse is when someone does something to hurt you, and when you express your feelings, that you’re upset, they turn it around to be something you did to hurt them and they force you to apologize for it, and your feelings, like always, are rendered invalid and silenced, forever damaging the ability to trust others with your feelings because they always are used against you.

this is important because so many people don’t know this

yuzu-dono:

I cnnot stop drawing homestuck
i cnnot
daves cool btw

yuzu-dono:

I cnnot stop drawing homestuck

i cnnot

daves cool btw

(Source: robin-el-gucci)

appendingfic:

ironcheflancaster:

wedonotpromoteviolence:

heirofspacecore:

sleek-black-wings:

thederpywingedone:

batmansymbol:

by the way did I ever tell y’all about the time I got a blank message from nobody, sent on new year’s eve in 1969, when the internet didn’t exist?
because that happened

What the fuck

Time travel.

Or maybe its from 2069, when we’ve developed the technology to send data to the past. You sent yourself a blank message as a test but as the email address you used to send it doesnt exist yet, it came up as no sender

I… what?

OKAY KIDS, LET’S LEARN ABOUT THE UNIX EPOCH
So back in the early days of computers, when we were trying to build clocks to keep all our computers in sync, we tried a bunch of different ways to synchronize them in ways that both normal people could use and programmers could utilize.
We just tried saying “The current time is THIS date” and just storing that date as some text, but while that was easy for humans, it was a bunch of different numbers that worked together in funny ways and computers don’t play nice with a bunch of random, arbitrary rules.
Not much worked, until we realized that we needed a BASELINE to compare against, and a way to represent the current time that covers everybody. So we came up with Unix time, because Unix was the style at the time. Essentially, Unix time represents any given time by saying “How many seconds ago was 12:00 AM on January 1, 1970 in Iceland somewhere?”. Recent enough to keep the numbers relatively small, far enough that nothing computer-y would fall before it, and consistent enough that there’d be no discrepancy based on where you are.
So what happens when you see the date “December 31, 1969” on a buggy message like this is that the computer received a bunch of zeroes by mistake and went “Oh, this must be a message!” Then when it tried to interpret it, it got to the date, found a zero, and said “Zero seconds since the Unix Epoch? I’ll round down - this was sent at the last second of New Year’s Eve, 1969! They’ll be so happy to finally get their blank message.”
And then the computer traipsed off on its merry way, because computers are fucking ridiculous.

This is frankly more hilarious than the 1969 time traveler theory

appendingfic:

ironcheflancaster:

wedonotpromoteviolence:

heirofspacecore:

sleek-black-wings:

thederpywingedone:

batmansymbol:

by the way did I ever tell y’all about the time I got a blank message from nobody, sent on new year’s eve in 1969, when the internet didn’t exist?

because that happened

What the fuck

Time travel.

Or maybe its from 2069, when we’ve developed the technology to send data to the past. You sent yourself a blank message as a test but as the email address you used to send it doesnt exist yet, it came up as no sender

I… what?

OKAY KIDS, LET’S LEARN ABOUT THE UNIX EPOCH

So back in the early days of computers, when we were trying to build clocks to keep all our computers in sync, we tried a bunch of different ways to synchronize them in ways that both normal people could use and programmers could utilize.

We just tried saying “The current time is THIS date” and just storing that date as some text, but while that was easy for humans, it was a bunch of different numbers that worked together in funny ways and computers don’t play nice with a bunch of random, arbitrary rules.

Not much worked, until we realized that we needed a BASELINE to compare against, and a way to represent the current time that covers everybody. So we came up with Unix time, because Unix was the style at the time. Essentially, Unix time represents any given time by saying “How many seconds ago was 12:00 AM on January 1, 1970 in Iceland somewhere?”. Recent enough to keep the numbers relatively small, far enough that nothing computer-y would fall before it, and consistent enough that there’d be no discrepancy based on where you are.

So what happens when you see the date “December 31, 1969” on a buggy message like this is that the computer received a bunch of zeroes by mistake and went “Oh, this must be a message!” Then when it tried to interpret it, it got to the date, found a zero, and said “Zero seconds since the Unix Epoch? I’ll round down - this was sent at the last second of New Year’s Eve, 1969! They’ll be so happy to finally get their blank message.”

And then the computer traipsed off on its merry way, because computers are fucking ridiculous.

This is frankly more hilarious than the 1969 time traveler theory

khoaahish:

Intrigued by Bangladeshi Architect Rafiq Azam’s contribution to architecture.

useful tools

bossies:

amazing custom water/light reference tool
http://www.madebyevan.com/webgl-water/

image

online perspective manager/maker
http://www33.atwiki.jp/kndy/pages/94.html

online photoshop
http://pixlr.com/editor/